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TheClydebankStory

Clyde Shipyards, 1930s

Glasgow University Archive Services, photographic collection

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Keywords: A & J Inglis, aerial views, D & W Henderson, dry docks, Govan New Shipyard, Govan Old Shipyard, Govan Shipyard, Harland & Wolff, Meadowside Shipyard, Middleton Shipyard, Pointhouse Shipyard, River Clyde, River Kelvin, shipbuilders, ships, shipyards, Thomas B Sneath, Tod & MacGregor, Waverley

Three Harland & Wolff shipyards on the Clyde. The company's yard in Govan (on the site of the Govan Old, Govan New and Middleton yards) is at the bottom, left, opposite the former D & W Henderson's (on the west bank of the Kelvin) and the former A & J Inglis' (east) shipyards.

The Meadowside Shipyard was founded 1844 by Tod & MacGregor in 1862 and was occupied by Hendersons in 1872. It was acquired by Harland & Wolff after the First World War but closed in 1935. The dry dock, clearly shown leading off from the Kelvin, was in-filled in 1969.

Thomas B Sneath founded a shipyard at Pointhouse c 1845 and it was acquired by A & J Inglis in 1862 and then by Harland & Wolff in 1919. The paddle steamer Waverley was built at the yard in 1946. Shipbuilding was discontinued there in 1962.

Harland & Wolff acquired the three old Govan shipyards in 1912 and built a single well-equipped yard on the site. It closed in 1962.

Reference: UGD241/2/1

Reproduced with the permission of Glasgow University Archive Services



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